News

News

Department Experts in the News

October 30, 2020

David B. Roth, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, participated in an NBC News global hangout on "Testing Times" with experts from the US, UK, and South Korea to discuss the state of testing and COVID-19, from kinds of tests being used to detect the disease to strategies for managing the spread of the virus.

Una O'Doherty MD, PhD, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and an apheresis physician in the Division of Transfusion Medicine, was quoted in a recent New York Times article on a woman with HIV may have been cured by her own immune system. The woman who was infected with HIV in 1992 may be the first person cured of the virus without a risky bone-marrow transplant or even medications, according to research published in Nature. Dr. O'Doherty, an expert in analyzing large volumes of cells, said she was impressed by the results overall, but added that it is "encouraging, but speculative." The research suggests T cell immune approaches against HIV can be successful. Apheresis is essential for such studies as many billions of cells must be assayed to have meaningful results.

Sara Cherry, PhD, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Microbiology, Scientific Director, High-throughput Screening Core, and Director, Program for Chemogenomic Discovery, is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer article on what to expect over the next six months of pandemic life as an expert who "has hard-earned insights into why COVID-19 drug discovery has been so difficult, and why breakthroughs could be on the horizon."

Eline Luning Prak, MD, PhD, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, was quoted in an ABC news story on monoclonal antibodies that have been used to treat cancers, inflammatory diseases and infections and that may now be a 'bridge' to coronavirus vaccines. "Antibodies form some of the most important medicines in the world for treating anything from cancer to autoimmune disease," she said.

Carl June, MD, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies in the Abramson Cancer Center, and Virginia Man-Yee Lee, PhD, Professor of Alzheimer’s Research in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, were named among the 76 most influential people in the region by Philadelphia magazine.