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Science Paper Describes Reengineered Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Targeted Therapy of Autoimmune Disease

July 05, 2016

In a Science study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, co-senior author Mike Milone, MD, PhD, and colleagues have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. The autoimmune disease the team studied is called pemphigus vulgaris (PV), a condition in which a patient's own immune cells attack a protein called desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) that normally adheres skin cells. The paper, published as a Science online First Release, demonstrates their new technique by successfully treating this otherwise fatal autoimmune disease in a mouse model, without apparent off-target effects, thus showing that engineered T cells can selectively target the antibody-producing cells that cause autoimmune disease. Blood Bank clinical fellow Dr. Vijay Bhoj is second author of the paper.
Read the Department of Communications news release.
Coverage in Philadelphia Inquirer
Coverage in BBC Health